Is There a Connection Between Social Media and Drug Use?

Is There a Connection Between Social Media and Drug Use?

News, information, and entertainment travel quickly today. In decades past, one had to wait to turn on the nightly news or for the local paper to publish their weekend edition to learn about the goings-on both locally and worldwide. The internet and social media have changed that. Today, things are available to view, download and forward on at the touch of a button. Unfortunately, this also means positive and negative information and insight travel with equal swiftness and can significantly impact everyone they touch. 

What Are the Popular Forms of Social Media? 

Before considering the connection between social media and drug use, it is important to understand what social media is. Social media is often loosely defined as a series of smartphone apps that can easily communicate with friends and family. Further simplified, social media consists of various social networks, including Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Social media is an internet-based technology that helps to facilitate the sharing and exchange of ideas, thoughts, and information across virtual networks and communities. Social media platforms provide users with an instant means of communication with those close by or those on the other side of the world. 

Today, more than three billion people worldwide use common forms of social media, including Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, and Instagram, among others. Data from the Pew Research Center indicates as many as ninety percent of people between ages nineteen and twenty-nine use at least one type of social media. 

Is There a Connection Between Social Media and Drug Use? 

Drug and alcohol misuse and abuse are not new problems in the United States.  Each year, over twenty-one million people meet the diagnostic criteria for substance use disorder. Struggles with drug use have been a problem long before the advent of social media. However, social media outlets provide a new and concerning opportunity for people to be exposed to drugs in ways they may not have found before. Although people of all ages are vulnerable to the effects of what they see on social media, teens and adolescents are likely more susceptible due to the strength of peer pressure and peer influence. Common social media sites, including Facebook and Snapchat, offer up an easy to access environment where people are exposed to people engaging in behaviors involving drugs and alcohol or discussing the use of drugs and alcohol.

Unfortunately, consistent exposure to celebrities, friends, or family engaging in substance use inevitably influences those who view the content. The constant presence of drug and alcohol use on social media may normalize or glamorize the behavior making people who wouldn’t usually turn to drugs believe that it’s OK to experiment with illicit or prescription drugs, for example.

Information from a survey conducted by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University showed that teenagers who regularly viewed popular social media sites were more likely to use drugs than adolescents who did not use social media. The same survey showed that this group of individuals was two times more likely to use marijuana than those who did not frequently utilize social media outlets.

For impressionable people on social media, seeking others on social media, partying and engaging in risky behaviors can lead them to turn to drugs or alcohol to “fit in.” Some studies indicate as many as 75% of young adults who see photos of others on social media sites smoking weed or using other substances encourage them to experiment in similar ways. Unfortunately, the same social media posts do not tend to encourage those struggling with addiction to seek addiction treatment to overcome drug addiction

Reach Out to Us Today at Relevance Recovery 

Social media outlets provide increased opportunities for people of all ages to be exposed to substance use. Either through photographs, chats, or open discussion, information about drug use and abuse is far more widely available today than ever before, leading to new or worsening struggles with addiction for many. If you would like to learn more about how Relevance Recovery can help you overcome an addiction to drugs, contact us today

Finding Cocaine Recovery Treatment Near Me

Finding Cocaine Recovery Treatment Near Me

Cocaine is a highly addictive stimulant drug that interacts with the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) to produce intense feelings of euphoria and energy. Cocaine is a manufactured drug created using the leaves of the coca plant native to South America. Cocaine is processed into a fine white powder that is commonly consumed by snorting it into the nose; however, it can be rubbed onto the gums, smoked, or mixed with liquid and injected into the veins. 

In 2018, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health data indicated cocaine was the second most common drug associated with fatalities in the United States that year. The effects of cocaine are immediate and intense, yet they are not long-lasting. The short-lived nature of the impact of the drug leads many people to come back for more frequent and often more substantial doses. For many who struggle with a cocaine addiction, achieving sobriety and recovery are challenging without detox and comprehensive addiction treatment. 

Signs of Cocaine Addiction

Cocaine use leads to physical and psychological effects on the user. To better understand if you or a loved one should seek treatment for cocaine use, it is necessary to understand the signs and symptoms of cocaine addiction. Chronic, long-term cocaine use can lead to significant physical and psychological health risks. Some of the most common signs you may notice immediately after using cocaine include excessive energy, runny nose, improved concentration, dilated pupils, appetite changes, and paranoia. These symptoms generally wear off after a very short time, typically no more than 30 minutes.

As you begin to develop a tolerance to cocaine and an addiction to the effects of the drug, larger and more frequent doses are often required to attain the same high you achieved when you first began using. As cocaine use becomes more regular and the dosing size increases, cocaine can start to have irreversible and overwhelmingly detrimental effects on the body. Examples of common physical effects include headaches, increased blood pressure, nausea and vomiting, chills, seizures, heart attack, stroke, and death. Psychological effects of chronic cocaine use may include significant mood changes and difficulties with memory and focus.

The extent and severity of the long-term effects of cocaine use depend on the severity of one’s addiction. The more often and the more frequently you use cocaine, the more likely you are to develop potentially life-threatening symptoms and side effects from its use. Chronic use of cocaine will eventually lead to detrimental and often irreversible effects on vital, life-sustaining body systems, including the brain, respiratory system, cardiovascular system, and gastrointestinal system.

How Cocaine Recovery Treatment Works

If you are concerned you or a loved one may have a cocaine addiction, it is vital to seek addiction treatment help immediately. Long-term untreated cocaine addiction can be fatal. Cocaine changes how the body produces and releases chemicals in the body responsible for feelings of pleasure and happiness. Eventually, the user believes they need to use cocaine to feel “normal.” Although cocaine withdrawal does not produce significant physical symptoms (as you may see when detoxing from alcohol or opioids), the psychological symptoms of cocaine withdrawal can vary widely and be challenging to manage without comprehensive treatment support.

A treatment program for cocaine addiction typically focuses on behavioral change. Using a combination of evidence-based therapy models and alternative therapy options, the team at Relevance Recovery will work with you to design a treatment program that meets your unique treatment needs and goals. The most common behavioral therapy used to treat cocaine addiction is cognitive-behavioral therapy or CBT. The CBT model encourages you to examine negative thoughts and behaviors to better understand the roots of your addiction. Only after understanding the triggers that lead you to cocaine use can you change your addictive behaviors. Other common therapies may include contingency management or motivational incentives, therapeutic communities, and community-based recovery groups such as 12 step programs.

Reach Out to Relevance Recovery Today

Left untreated, cocaine addiction can have overwhelmingly harmful impacts on your physical, psychological, and spiritual health. With the proper support and the right treatment environment, recovery and long-term freedom from cocaine are possible. If you are ready to begin your journey towards healing, contact us at Relevance Recovery today. 

Why You Should Go to Heroin Treatment in New Jersey

Why You Should Go to Heroin Treatment in New Jersey

For several years, the opioid epidemic has been at the forefront of concern for law enforcement, federal and state agencies, medical providers, and addiction treatment professionals. It is safe to say that nearly everyone across the United States has, in some way, been touched by the impacts of opioid addiction. The effects of opioid use are not restricted to any one demographic, region, or economic standing. Addiction, overdose, and death from opioid use can affect anyone at any time. Opioid is a broad term used to describe various prescription and illicit drugs, including prescription painkillers and “street drugs” such as heroin. 

What Is Heroin?

Heroin is classified as an opioid. It is manufactured using morphine, a naturally occurring substance taken from the seed pod of the opium poppy plants grown in Asia, Mexico, and Columbia. Depending on how it is manufactured, heroin can be a white or brown powder or a black sticky substance referred to as black tar heroin. Heroin goes by other names, including smack and hell dust. It can be taken into the body in several ways, including smoking, snorting, inhaled through the nose, or injected. Some people also mix heroin with crack cocaine to create a more potent drug. This practice is known as speedballing. 

What Are the Signs Someone Needs Heroin Treatment in New Jersey?

Heroin is a highly addictive drug. The risk of overdose with heroin use is significant, and it does not take long for someone using heroin to develop a tolerance for the drug, increasing their risk for overdose further. Depending on the duration of someone’s addiction, symptoms may be mild at first and progress rapidly as they continue to use, or their dosing increases due to tolerance. In many cases, the physical symptoms of heroin use occur quickly. After someone injects heroin, they will feel symptoms of euphoria and happiness, often within a matter of seconds.

Signs of addiction and indicators someone needs heroin treatment in New Jersey manifest in physical and psychological ways. Some of the most common physical symptoms of heroin use include dry mouth, flushed skin, constricted pupils, itching, vomiting, decreased respiratory rate, and gastric disturbances. Another common symptom that is easily noticed is constricted pupils. People who use heroin regularly often need laxatives or stool softeners as ongoing use can cause chronic and severe constipation. You may also see nonphysical signs and symptoms, including new or worsening financial difficulties, drug-seeking behavior, the presence of drug paraphernalia, increased isolation, and new or worsening legal problems. 

Someone addicted to heroin and has developed a tolerance will experience withdrawal symptoms when they reduce or stop using. Symptoms of withdrawal are another sign someone needs heroin treatment. Some of the most common withdrawal symptoms those who have developed a substance use disorder may experience when withdrawing from heroin include jitters or shaking, gastrointestinal issues (vomiting, nausea, vomiting), body aches and bone pain, changes in sleeping, and eating patterns, and uncontrollable leg movements. In other more severe cases, withdrawal symptoms from heroin (as well as other opioids) could include severe and life-threatening withdrawal symptoms. These may consist of delirium tremens (DTs), abnormal heart rate, abnormal respiratory rates, and seizures.

Reach Out to Relevance Recovery Today for More Information About Heroin Treatment in New Jersey

If you or a loved one struggles with heroin addiction, don’t wait to seek treatment. Chronic heroin use can result in detrimental physical and psychological effects. Because heroin withdrawal can result in severe and sometimes life-threatening symptoms, medically supervised detox is highly recommended for those looking to quit heroin. In a medically supervised setting, a team of highly trained medical professionals is available throughout the detox process to ensure your safety. Once detox is complete, you can successfully transition into the therapeutic portion of an addiction treatment program in New Jersey. If you are ready to overcome heroin addiction, contact us at Relevance in New Jersey today to learn more about our comprehensive treatment programs.